How We’ll be Teased

Bob Stanley, Melody Maker, 1989 ‘Sweet Jesus, The Stone Roses have arrived’

Andrew Collins, The Word, 2012 ‘The Stone Roses may not have been the greatest band in the world, but they certainly felt like it’

Ian Brown, Heaton Park, 29th June 2012 ‘Where did it all go wrong?’

They didn’t put a foot wrong last night. A few highlights.
The last five minutes of Fools Gold- I could watch them play it for an hour- liquid, rolling, funky, beautiful.
Don’t Stop- the backwards song, played sounding backwards, totally trippy and mesmerising.
This Is The One- perfect and sublime.
I Am The Resurrection- tumbling on and on.

They may have George Bested it first time round but they put themselves firmly back on the map as contenders last night. I’d go again tonight if I could.

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The Return Of Friday Night Is Rockabilly Night 65

Late 50s rocking goodness for you while I’m on my way to Heaton Park. This is Jaycee Hill, owner of a mean haircut and a mean stare, and song about a girl who went Bump!

Bump!

This Is The One

Tonight, after all the waiting, after the rumours about Reni and the ‘bust up’ in Amsterdam and all the internet waffle (pro and anti) and that night in Warrington, tonight is the night.

Wish me luck, I’m going in.

Sally Cinnamon (the first thing I heard by them, like many other people from round here I suspect. On this remastered version the guitar, bass and drums sparkle).

Life In Havana

Paul Simonon’s post-Clash outfit Havana 3am may not be very fondly remembered (if they are remembered at all) but their only album, released in 1991, has a couple of decent songs. I posted the spaghetti western/dub track Hey Amigo! over two years ago. I pulled it out again recently and gave it a quick spin and this one stood out, with its very nice picked bassline, some bongos and sparse guitar and a vocal that, if you close your eyes, could almost be Joe.

The picture shows that whatever they may have said about it being a band, Paul was the de facto frontman and main selling point. And hey, quite right too.

Life On The Line

Count Five

It’s a funny thing how in music the artists with a body of work are on the whole the ones held up for veneration. To be really taken seriously you have to have a large back catalogue, as if the quantity of music produced is the real signifier of serious musicians and artists. San Jose’s Count Five produced one single and one album but I’d take this one song over, say, Bruce Springsteen’s entire recorded output (yeah, I know Nebraska’s supposed to be good). Covered by The Cramps as well, on Smell Of Female.

Psychotic Reaction

Unrehearsed Let The Bubbles Burst

Just imagine- a time when the cover of the NME meant something and there was the possibility of an in-depth interview written for adults.

I’m still getting used to the fact, after a couple of weeks of on-off listening, that John Lydon has made a necessary album. The new PiL album, despite one or two mis-steps, is a real grower. The song One Drop is proof on its own- vital, angry, alive, stomping stuff. Go and find it somewhere, you won’t regret it (I’ve already posted a song off it so shouldn’t really do another). The interview clips on Punk Britannia showed he’s still got it as well- sharp and witty. A real one-off is John. The last time he sounded anywhere near as good was in the mid-90s with this still thrilling collaboration with Leftfield, the number one piece of punk-house.

Open Up

Fat Neck

Out on penalties. Again.

I’m not sure I liked Black Grape that much, although the first album had its moments. 1996 single Fat Neck was a tribute to Karl Power, who specialised in sneaking into major sporting events- he walked up to the crease padded up for England at cricket, got onto court at Wimbledon and lined up for United away in a Champions League tie (see above, far left. See also Roy Keane, far right, who has spotted him. Run, Karl, run). Did he play last night? Fat Neck also has Johnny Marr on guitar.

Fat Neck