Isolation Mix Thirteen

Lockdown ends today- at least, that’s how the government and the media have been portraying it with occasional reminders that social distancing and a 2 metre gap might be important. The government have largely dropped the daily infection figures and death toll from their bulletins. You don’t want to be depressing people at this stage of proceedings with doom and gloom, not when there are pints to be drunk! The media have been splashing stories about Super Saturday, Independence Day and the End Of Hibernation. It does look like they deliberately chose July 4th so they could call it an Independence Day. Meanwhile, Leicester is in lockdown, the R rate in London is apparently creeping above 1, there are Covid hotspots around the country, the deaths are still well over one hundred every day, and lots of people are talking about a second wave and a second spike without the people in charge actually wanting to do anything about it. We are still shielding, the medical advice we received this week is that due to our son Isaac being in the extremely vulnerable category we should stay in isolation until August 1st. Despite a few minor changes to our lockdown lives, we are still very much in isolation.

This mix is an hour and eight minutes of music with a folky, ambient, pastoral tinge with some Balearica and guitars thrown in, some old stuff and some brand new- some birdsong and synth ambience to start and finish, blissed out tracks from Seahawks, Apiento and Ultramarine, Green Gartside solo and as Scritti Politti, acoustic guitars courtesy of Nancy Noise, Michael Head and Barry Woolnough, some understated brilliance from The Clash and Sandinista!, Julian Cope covering Roky Erickson, Thurston Moore covering New Order and Jane Weaver’s cosmic/folky weirdness.

Tracklist-
Stubbleman: 4am Conversation

Seahawks: Islands

Nancy Noise: Kaia

Green Gartside: Tangled Man

Barry Woolnough: Great Spirit Father In The Sky

The Clash: Rebel Waltz

Thurston Moore: Leave Me Alone

Julian Cope: I Have Always Been Here Before

Jane Weaver: Slow Motion (Loops Variation)

Michael Head and the Red Elastic Band: Picasso

Scritti Pollitti: The Boom Boom Bap

Apiento: Things You Do For Love

Ultramarine: Stella (Stella Connects)

Stubbleman: 6am Chorus

Cheap Gasoline

These photographs were published as part of a much larger set in a Clash group I’m a member of, the band in Monterey, California on September 9th 1979. As a set of pictures of four men who have absolutely nailed a look and that four men against the world mentality they take some beating and the sheer colour, excitement and drama of The Clash on the road is evident. Joe in red and white with white brothel creepers and ending up in the crowd, Paul all in black with jeans tucked into his biker boots and quiff perfectly in place, Mick in black and white with sunburst Les Paul, and Topper in pink.

The Tribal Stomp was an attempt to put on a festival reviving something of the spirit of the hippies but attracting some of the punks. It was poorly attended than the organisers hoped and they lost loads of money. The Clash played it as part of their first big US tour, after recording London Calling in the summer of ’79 but not yet releasing it until December. Peter Tosh, Robert Fripp, Canned Heat, Country Joe and The Fish and Big Mama Thornton also played and it was MCed by original Woodstock MC Wavy Gravy. Taking the stage Joe told the audience “We brought some cheap gasoline with us and we’re selling it at the side of the stage for 50 cents a gallon”. They then charge into a largely pre- London Calling set, an hour of high octane punk rock energy, built around the songs and singles from 1977 and 1978- I’m So bored With The USA, Complete Control, London Calling, Jail Guitar Doors, (White Man In) Hammersmith Palais, Drug Stabbing Time, Police And Thieves, Stay Free, Safe European Home, Capital Radio, Clash City Rockers, What’s My Name, Janie Jones, Garageland, Armagideon Time and Career Opportunities. Joe Ely joins them for Fingernails and then the obligatory ending of White Riot. It is fast and loud and close to the edge and at times almost out of control, the pedal well and truly pushed down to the floor. The set has been widely bootlegged and the recording is pretty rough and ready. If you want the entire set it’s here but these four are among the best in terms of sound and listenability (if you accept that it’s a bit like listening to The Clash on a transistor radio in the next room- but maybe that adds to the authenticity of the experience).

Stay Free

Capital Radio

Garageland

Armagideon Time

Isolation Mix Six

I got this dramatic shot of the sky over the Mersey on Thursday night. One habit I hope I manage to maintain once this is all over, whenever that is, is taking regular walks. You miss so much sitting inside and even the most familiar and mundane places can look different when caught at a particular time. This week’s Isolation Mix is a dubwise and post punk excursion from The Clash, some dubbed out Joy Division covers, Bauhaus, The Slits, Killing Joke remixed by Thrash, a bunch of Andrew Weatherall dub versions and some On U Sound from Dub Syndicate.

The Clash: The Crooked Beat

Steve Mason: Boys Outside (Andrew Weatherall Dub 2)

Jah Division: Dub Will Tear Us Apart

Jah Division: Dub Disorder

Bauhaus: Bela Lugosi’s Dead

The Slits: I Heard It Through The Grapevine

Dub Syndicate: Ravi Shankar Part.1

Sabres Of Paradise: Ysaebud

New Order: Regret (Sabres Slow ‘n’ Lo)

Lark: Can I Colour In Your Hair (Andrew Weatherall Version)

Killing Joke: Requiem (A Floating Leaf Always Reaches The Sea Dub Mix)

Montego Bay

In November 1982 The Clash arrived in Jamaica to play at the World Music Festival, held in the Bob Marley Performing Centre, Montego Bay. The grandly named arena was apparently not much more than a gravel car park with a stage at one end. The line up looks incredibly impressive all these decades later. As well as Ladbroke Grove’s finest, The Beat, The Grateful Dead, Squeeze, Joe Jackson, the B- 52s, Jimmy Cliff, Peter Tosh, Toots And The Maytals, Black Uhuru, a touring version of The Beach Boys, Rick James, Aretha Franklin and Gladys Knight were all booked to play. The Clash had sacked Topper Headon by this point, his heroin use pushing him out of the band (a move that Joe admitted years later was the start of the end). Terry Chimes had been drafted back in, on the basis that he at least knew all the early songs. Clash history has treated Terry a little unfairly, his re- naming on the sleeve of the first album as Tory Crimes, his unwillingness to get on board with the band’s political stance and self confessed desire for a Ferrari. Admittedly, he wasn’t as good a drummer as Topper, but who was? The sets he played with the group in 1982 and 1983 show he was more than capable of filling the drum stool as they slogged their way round stadia (supporting The Who), arenas and festivals.

At Montego Bay problems with the running order and set timings meant The Clash didn’t take the stage until very late on the second night of the festival, about 4.00am. Feelings were running high and people were pissed off. There’s a story about the band demanding $200, 000 in cash to play and being the only band that refused to be filmed. Joe was unhappy about ticket prices excluding the locals from attending. The audience, not unsurprisingly at that time of the night/morning were a bit subdued, Joe trying to whip up some atmosphere on a couple of occasions including threatening to send The Grateful Dead on in their place. The set has been widely bootlegged, recorded from the sound desk. The Clash, according to people who were there and the evidence of this recording, were pulling out all the stops and gave it their all from opening with London Calling and then onward. The middle section of their set, from Junco Partner through to Bankrobber sounds particularly good. It’s Friday. Red Stripe. Jerk chicken. The Clash.

London Calling
Police On My Back
Guns Of Brixton
The Magnificent Seven/ Armagideon Time
Junco Partner
Spanish Bombs
One More Time
Train In Vain
Bankrobber
This Is Radio Clash
Clampdown
Should I Stay Or Should I Go
Rock The Casbah

Straight To Hell
I Fought The Law

Isolation Mix Three

It’s over halfway through April already. The weeks seem to be flying by even though some of the days seem very long. This is Isolation Mix Three. I thought I’d do something different from the ambient, blissed out, opiated sounds of the first two mixes and this mix is something that I first wrote about doing in a post here about three years ago. This is an hour and three minutes of spoken word and poetry and music. Andrew Weatherall features in various guises and with various poets, the Beat Generation and The Clash are represented, there’s some reggae and the unmistakable voice of John Cooper Clarke.

Jack Kerouac/Joe Strummer: MacDougal Street Blues

John Cooper Clarke: Twat

Misty In Roots: Introduction to Live At The Counter Eurovision

Linton Kwesi Johnson: Inglan Is A Bitch

The Clash (and Allen Ginsberg): Ghetto Defendant (Extended Version)

Allen Ginsberg/ Tom Waits: Closing Time/America

Andrew Weatherall and Michael Smith: The Deep Hum (At The Heart Of It All)

Joe Gideon and The Shark: Civilisation

Woodleigh Research Facility and Joe Duggan: Downhill

Fireflies and Joe Duggan: Leonard Cohen Knows

BP Fallon and David Holmes: Henry McCullough (Andrew Weatherall Remix)

Mike Garry and Joe Duddell: St Anthony: An Ode To Anthony H Wilson (Andrew Weatherall Remix)

Allen Ginsberg: I Am A Victim Of Telephone

Slamdance Cosmopolis

A Clash song and cover for Friday, a song from the tail end of the group’s lifespan, when the days of squats in Davis Road must have seemed an eternity and a world away. By 1982 The Clash were playing stadiums (supporting The Who) and releasing an album which was partly made for mass appeal with singles that would get them on the radio and also an album that was very internationalist in its subject matter, about the Far East and New York rather than the Westway. Much of Combat Rock has a melancholic, weighty feel. Ghetto Defendant has a downbeat reggae groove with a particularly good bassline from Simonon, many memorable lines from Strummer about heroin addiction and Allen Ginsberg as ‘the voice of God’. Jean Arthur Rimbaud, The Paris Commune, Marseilles, Guatemala, the Hundred Years War, Afghanistan…

Mick initially saw Combat Rock as another long album, fifteen or sixteen songs with extended dance mixes and lengthy intros and outros. He lost that argument as the album was remixed by Glyn Johns, trimmed back to forty six minutes and had several songs shelved. The Sound System box set included this original, longer Mick Jones version of the song, everything stretched out a bit further, more reggae groove, more bass, more Strummer and more Ginsberg.

Ghetto Defendant (Extended Version)

In 2017 New York’s Megative put out a cover of Ghetto Defendant, an even more downbeat version than the original, slow and heavy but with enough groove to get you shuffling, slightly. Megative have their own apocalyptic take on the punky reggae party and on the basis of this cover plenty to bring.

Ghetto Defendant 

Davis Road Blues

This is 22 Davis Road, Shepherd’s Bush, West London. In 1976 this was a squat occupied by Viv Albertine and Alan Drake, both studying art at the Hammersmith School of Art and Building, Lime Grove, Shepherd’s Bush (later known as Chelsea Art College). Viv met a fellow art student Mick Jones who enrolled mainly because he thought art college was the best place to go to start a band. Mick began visiting the squat at Davis Road, along with Paul Simonon who he met through an audition for a band he tried to put together months earlier and had recently bumped into again- he couldn’t sing or play but looked right and Mick began to teach him bass. Alan Drake’s friend Keith Levene was another regular visitor to Davis Road. Paul moved in downstairs and rehearsals took place there, for an as yet unnamed band. Viv’s friend Simon (Sid) moved in. Mick had met Bernie Rhodes who wanted to manage Mick’s nascent group and began looking for a new rehearsal space, out of the squat. This would take them to Camden. Before that Jones, Simonon and Rhodes saw a pub rock band perform, The 101ers, and approached the lead singer/guitarist about leaving the old guard and jumping in with them, now called The Clash (a word that leapt out at Simonon while leafing through the local rag, the London Evening Standard). On June 1st 1976 Joe Strummer turned up at 22 Davis Road to tell them he was in. Future members of The Clash, Sex Pistols, PiL and The Slits all came from the squat at 22 Davis Road.

Prince Blanco was born Mark Atrill on the Isle of Wight in 1965. By the mid 90s was playing in ska and reggae bands. He became involved with various reggae producers and musicians including Dubmatix, who in 2009 made an album of dub versions of Clash songs called Shatter The Hotel, a tribute to Strummer and a benefit for the Strummerville charity (the album also involved Don Letts and Dan Donovan). There’s something about Clash songs that lend themselves to covers, dubs, versions, re-edits, remixes and refits. There are some groups whose songs should be left alone but I’m always open to reworkings of Clash tunes. Prince Blanco’s track here isn’t a Clash cover as such, it’s a dub track with Mick Jones’ guitar from B.A.D.’s The Bottom Line dropped in and a vocal from an interview with Joe Strummer.

Davis Road Blues

Joe Strummer

Joe Strummer died on this day in 2002, seventeen years ago. It seems fitting to remember this each year and especially so this year, London Calling being all over the media and the internet. There’s a good BBC show here where Pennie Smith, Don Letts and Johnny Green listen to the album and talk about their memories and role in it.

In 2001 Joe and his Mescaleros had released Global A Go- Go, an album which had back at the top of his game and leading a band who suited him. The gigs they played to promote it were raucous and life affirming affairs, Joe mixing up the new songs with Clash ones. I was at the opening night of the tour at Manchester Academy, November 17th, the venue packed with all the young punks and the old punks too, out in force. Early on there were a few beers arcing through the air towards the stage. Bass player Scott Shields scowled as he got a soaking, lager down the front of his shirt. Joe noticed this and when the song finished told Scott, over the mic, not to worry about as things were about to get a lot worse- they then ploughed into Safe Eurpean Home and the whole venue went up in the air as one, seconds before more pints were flung towards the stage. The gig finished with a memorable version of Yalla Yalla and then Joe returning for the encore with a child on his shoulders before they group followed him on to play Bankrobber.

The song that closed Global A Go- Go was a version of a traditional Irish song, The Minstrel Boy, an eighteen minute lilting lament to the boys who have gone off to war.

Minstrel Boy

A different version of the song, shorter and with Joe’s vocals, was played over the closing credits of the 2001 film Black Hawk Down, a Ridley Scott about the U.S. army’s raid on Mogadishu, Somalia in 1993.

The Minstrel Boy

The lyrics are a version of Irish Republican Thomas Moore’s words, written in the late 18th or early 19th century.

‘The minstrel boy to the war is gone
In the ranks of death you’ll find him…

…thy songs were made for the pure and free
They shall never sound in slavery’

 

A Lot Of People Won’t Get No Supper Tonight

A London Calling postscript. On 7th December 1979 The Clash released London Calling as a single. I wrote about the song in the first of my posts about the album here so don’t intend to add much to that. Except this, the video, filmed by Don Letts on a wet night on the Thames on a barge at Cadogan pier. Letts didn’t know the Thames was tidal and that the pier, barge and boat he was filming from would rise and fall- and then it started to rain heavily. Despite all this The Clash, all in black with brothel creepers and quiffs, filmed against the black of the night, give it all.

The B-side to London Calling is Armagideon Time, a cover of a Willie Williams song from 1977. This is politicised righteous Clash rock reggae, the world where a lot of people are going  hungry and aren’t getting any justice, where they are gong to have to stand up and kick it over. Joe had been talking before the recording about the ideal length of time a song should last- two minutes and twenty eight seconds according to Strummer- and at that point in the recording of Armagideon Time Clash fixer/road manager Kosmo Vinyl can be heard on the studio mic telling the group their time was up.

Strummer responds instantly ‘OK, OK, don’t push us when we’re hot!’ all of which adds to the take. Mick later added some electric sitar and there are the noises of fireworks and bombs going off. Armagideon Time is yet another Clash B-side that stands alongside their A- sides in terms of quality and passion. For the 12″ they pushed it even further with a nine minute dub excursion.

Justice Tonight/ Kick It Over

Weddings, Parties, Anything… And Bongo Jazz A Speciality

Flip side three over, the drama of The Card Cheat fading in your ears. Place it on the turntable, lift the arm of the stereo, let’s have it, London Calling side four.

Lover’s Rock opens up side four and it’s the worst song on the album for me, by some distance. The tune is alright and Mick’s guitar playing has some moments but it’s a one idea groove largely. The song’s title is named after the hugely popular, commercial style of 70s reggae, a genre with some brilliant songs from artists such as Janet Kay, Dennis Brown, John Holt and Susan Cadogan. However Joe’s lyrics are confused or confusing. In the first verse he tells the listener to ‘treat your lover girl right’ but then goes on to blame her for forgetting to take her contraceptive pill and warns that ‘no one will know the poor baby’s name’. In the second verse he steps into a book he was reading at the time, The Tao Of Love And Sex, and points the finger at western men who need more self control in the bedroom before setting out what a genuine lover should do-‘… take off his clothes/ he can make his lover in a thousand goes’. I don’t know what Joe was intending with this song- a genuine attempt at dealing with sexual politics? A pisstake of lover’s rock’s lyrics? Shaming men for the way their bedroom technique? Whatever he meant, I don’t think it works and it’s causes the only real dip in quality across the nineteen songs. Best to move on, move to….

Tsk- tsk- tsk- tsk clang! Four Horsemen!

‘Well they gave us the grapes that go ripe in the sun
That loosen the screws at the back of the tongue’

Four Horsemen is a ridiculous song (in a good way) and I love it. After all the apocalyptic mayhem, nuclear errors, card cheats, murders, capitalist alienation and sufferation Joe now imagines the band as the Four Horsemen- not the biblical ones from the Book of Revelation bringing war, pestilence, famine and death but four comical horsemen. These horsemen do not bring the end of the world but are ageing, stoned incompetence-

‘One was over the hill
One was over the cliff
One was licking them dry
With a bloody great spliff
When they picked up the hiker
He didn’t want a lift
From the horsemen’

The Clash loved to write about themselves- see Clash City Rockers, Garageband, All The Young Punks and The Last Gang In Town for starters- but here Joe has his tongue planted well in his cheek. Maybe this adds to the argument that the previous one is a joke and what opens side four is a pair of joke songs. Four Horsemen is definitely here to lighten the mood, not to be taken too seriously, but for all that Mick’s tune is a belter, Topper is hammering those drums full pelt and Joe gives a full throttle vocal performance. The verses tumble by in a mass of words and images, a crashing chorus, a middle eight with a spoken vocal part (a bit of a recurring technique of the album) and over the ending Joe singing ‘we know, only rock ‘n’ roll/we got rock ‘n’ roll’. The band freak out, guitars squealing and Topper pounding leading to an over the top, crescendo. It’s almost Death Or Glory inverted, or a Bizarro World version of it. Then there’s the final one of those clever segueways leading us straight into I’m Not Down.

Mick piles into I’m Not Down with a pair of chords and then Paul comes in with a lovely bass riff, a bar or two of funky guitar and when Mick calls ‘hup’ they lock into a great descending riff. Paul’s bass playing on this is superb and Mick’s guitar shines throughout, several Les Paul parts stacked up. Mick sings I’m Not Down, very much an autobiographical song detailing the things that have gone wrong in his life over the previous year, singing and playing his way out of bad times-

‘I’ve been beat up, I’ve been thrown out
But I’m not down, no I’m not down’

At the end of 1978 his flat had been burgled, he was attacked in the street by a group of Teddy Boys and then early on in 1979 his relationship with Viv Albertine ended. After all the topics Joe has written about on the album, from Three Mile Island to the Spanish Civil War, from drug dealers to working for the clampdown and then the comic nature of Four Horsemen and God knows what of Lover’s Rock, Mick doing a bit of self- affirmation and positive thinking Clash style is rather good. A proper, singalong, arms aloft Mick Jones song.

Revolution Rock then arrives to take us through to what should be London Calling’s end, a cover of a Danny Ray and The Revolutioneers song, the original out not long before The Clash recorded their version. I once played this song when DJing at a wedding and it down a storm. Revolution Rock is introduced by a Topper drum roll and then those frisky, catchy Irish Horns. This is The Clash go party, percussion and cheese graters leading the way, horns and dance rhythms after all the dread. Joe makes a few lyrical changes, turning ‘everybody get off their seat and rock to this brand new beat’ into the punkier ‘everybody smash up their seat…’. At the end of London Calling El Clash combo sign off with reggae and calypso via West London at the tail end of the 70s, a song to raise the spirits and end the night. Joe slips in a reference to Mack The Knife with the line ‘careful how you move Mac, you dig me in the back/ And I’m so pilled up that I rattle’ but ultimately this is a rave up and a celebration with Joe exhorting ‘tell your Mama Mama/ tell your Papa Papa/ everything’s gonna be alright’. The drop in the middle with the organ break and then Joe and the band coming back in is nothing short of wonderful. As the horns and organ and drums/bass/guitar begin to wind up their circling groove Joe goes into full on sequined jacket entertainer mode with the show band end of song announcement…

‘Any song you want
Playing requests now on the bandstand
El Clash combo
Paid fifteen dollars a day
Weddings, parties, anything
And bongo jazz a speciality…’

Revolution Rock

And that should be that but at the very end of the sessions, almost as the amps are unplugged and lights turned off Mick turns up with another song, one written the night before- Train In Vain. Riding in on a chugging railway rhythm, a superb instantly recognisable drumbeat from Topper, some harmonica and a funky guitar riff, and Mick’s feathery vocal about being left and alone, Train In Vain is a Clash pop song and none the worse for it. There’s a nod to Tammy Wynette in the my- girl- done- left- me lyrics (and she had left him Train In Vain being the second song on the album to be written in the aftermath of Mick’s break up with Viv Albertine) and to Ben E King with the ‘stand by me’ refrain. Mick’s in fine voice on the song especially the bit where he sings the ‘you must expl-ai- ai- ainn… why this must be’ part and it’s genuine and heartfelt. Joe was a bit dismissive of the song, a corny love song in his view, making vomiting faces when they played it live sometimes. It broke them in the USA though, a top 30 single. Viv, no stranger herself to being confrontational and spiky not least in song lyrics, says in her book Boys Clothes Music it is one of her favourite Clash songs.

Train In Vain wasn’t listed on London Calling’s sleeve. This led to various rumours and for a while it was going to be put out on an NME flexidisc giveaway but this fell through so it was put at the end of the album, the sleeve having already gone to print but the discs not yet gone to press. It’s difficult to imagine London Calling without it and after everything you’ve listened to and engaged with over the four sides that precede it, it’s a great way to fade out. On 18th February 1980 they played it at Lewisham Odeon, a gig some readers of this blog attended.

I used to work with a man who lived next door to Ray Lowry in Waterfoot, Lancashire. Ray was the cartoonist and illustrator who designed the album’s famous cover and then accompanied The Clash, at Strummer’s insistence, as their official war artist, sending hand drawn and written accounts to the NME as they toured the USA. My ex- colleague said Ray was a lovely bloke, a genuine character with tales to spare. Sadly Ray died in 2008 but there was an excellent exhibition of his work at Salford Art Gallery in 2009/2010 which I went to. There’s lots of his work here.

The sleeve obviously is legendary mainly due to Pennie Smith’s shot of Paul as he brings his bass guitar down on the stage at the New York Palladium, taking out his frustrations at the seated venue and the gig, his skinny, splayed legs instantly part of popular culture. Pennie famously had to step back quickly to take the picture and has always said it’s slightly out of focus- Joe always insisted it was the album cover from the moment he saw it. I’ve always loved the shot of Mick on the back cover too, skipping out of the spotlight onstage in Atlanta, Georgia with the crowd right up against the lip of the stage, no crush barriers or photographer’s pit, no distance at all between band and audience.

Value for money was a punk trope, the importance of not ripping the fans off was paramount. ‘Two albums for the price of one’ Joe claimed regarding London Calling and later ‘no Clash album will ever cost more than a fiver’. CBS didn’t agree. The band took a hit on the price of London Calling with (I think) it having to reach a sales figure of 100, 000 before they started making money from the royalties. The 40th anniversary vinyl re-issue is priced at £34.99, with a transparent sleeve that is removable so you can take off Ray Lowry’s Elvis inspired typography to see Pennie Smith’s shot of Simmo about to destroy his bass on its own. I’ll resist the temptation at that price thank you very much. Even with inflation factored in that’s a lot of money. Maybe, as The Clash pointed out themselves earlier in 1979, that’s The Cost Of Living. Or maybe its just another example of turning rebellion into money.

The punks and the purists say that London Calling is a long way from punk, and I suppose it is a long way from Year Zero, ‘No Elvis, Beatles or Rolling Stones’ and the absolute single mindedness of 1976. But The Clash had realised sounding like 1976 forever was a dead end and as a group they had to move on. The whole point of signing to CBS was to reach as many people as possible. Critics say that London Calling just put the group into the tradition of rock history, aligning them with the very lineage they were supposed to be a break from. They say that London Calling’s rebellion is posturing, a safe and comfortable rebellion, with the familiar sounds of ska, rock ‘n’ roll, reggae, soul, funk and rock all showing that the band were never really punks at all. But there’s plenty in the nineteen songs on these four sides which is exhilarating, confrontational, questioning and infused with the electricity of punk, the raw spirit of what fired them up in the first place. There were bands at the same time going deeper, going to the existential extremities of post punk- PiL released Metal Box in the same year, Unknown Pleasures came out earlier in 1979, both are more internalised, bleaker and more experimental excursions out of the punk. London Calling isn’t an internal expression of bleakness or suppressed emotions, it looks out into the world, takes glee in the colours and varieties on offer, takes shots at those in power and stands up for the underdog. Punk, looking back, wasn’t a new start, it was a full stop, the last gasp of the cycle of garage bands that began in 1955, spun round to 1966 and arced again in 1977. The new start was what came next, the splintering of the new groups and sounds in a thousand directions, something which continued to resonate in the next youthquake of the late 80s. The Clash found their own road out of punk’s cul de sac with London Calling, a record that is thrilling, emotional, open minded and most of all alive.

Paul Simonon ‘I never wanted to go back and relive the glory days, I just want to keep moving forward. That’s what I took from punk. Keep going. Don’t look back.’