Road Block

Sometimes it’s only proper Jamaican dub from the mid 70s that really fills that hole, that provides the basslines and the rhythms and the s p a c e. And then you realise you must have Augustus Pablo’s melodica snaking around on top. And King Tubby at the controls. And all is good.

Road Block

Road Block was on 1974’s Ital Dub and was written by Bob Marley and Aston Barrett, a version of The Wailers’ Rebel Music. Here’s the whole album for your Saturday morning skank. It won’t help you get much done but you’ll have a good time doing very little while this plays.

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Duffed Up

I was listening to Primal Scream’s Echo Dek album on Monday as the sun started to heat the day up and blue skies appeared for the third day running. In 1997 Bobby and co. gave Adrian Sherwood the tapes to their Vanishing Point album and let him do what he wanted to them. Echo Dek is largely stunning, full of thundering bass, heavy rhythms, static and hiss, echo and delay and door bells ringing. The second track on the album is a reworking of Get Duffy, a Martin Duffy keyboard led groover from the source album. Duffed Up heads into a dub/skronky jazz soundtrack area with a horn section and harpsichord. Massive Attack and Mad Professor’s No Protection pulled off the same trick in 1995, experimental mid 90s dub funded by major labels (and the Oasis millions).

Duffed Up

Stop Wasting Time

Sunday night ended up with a bit of an impromptu gathering in our garden due to it being a bank holiday Monday the following day and very warm and sunny. The drinking started at about 5pm and carried on through til late. The neighbours were all given the benefit of various albums and compilations playing from inside the house out into the garden, starting off with the Mastercuts Classic House comp (vinyl, sounding a bit crackly and worn in places), then the first four sides of Sandinista!, with the switch from Voodoo Ray to The Magnificent 7 working very well indeed. Sandinista! works really well on cd, and Mick Jones’ remastering on the Sound System edition is spectacular, revealing new delights with almost every listen.

Side 2 of Sandinista! is essentially a Clash mixtape, opening with Rebel Waltz, a much overlooked moment of brilliance, a Mose Allison cover, some sweltering Simonon dub (The Crooked Beat), a blinding rock song (Somebody Got Murdered) and then The Clash and Mikey Dread kicking it out in a proper reggae style with One More Time and it’s dub sister. One More Time is Strummer’s depiction of ghetto poverty and the civil rights movement of the 60s, with the band on fire in the Electric Ladyland studio. It is followed by Mikey Dread’s heavier dubbed out version.

One More Time
One More Dub

How Soon Is Dub

You may think that the recorded works of Morrissey, Marr, Rourke and Joyce are so sacrosanct that they shouldn’t be mucked with. I don’t as it happens, I’m more than  happy for people to rework and remix almost everything and anything if it’s done well. Plus, seeing as Morrissey sees fit to spew shit all over his legacy there’s no reason why the odd bootlegger and remixer shouldn’t (and given his ‘all reggae is vile’ comment back in the 80s this seems even more fitting). This is a dub version of How Soon Is Now, using the original track, especially Johnny Marr’s wonderful guitar parts, and adding the dub elements in increasingly as it rides on. As a bonus there’s precious little Morrissey involved in it too.

How Soon Is Now Dubweiser Remix

Money Dealers

Let’s end the week with some dub, a previously unreleased track from On-U Sound about to be part of a Dub Syndicate vinyl re-issue set (first four albums) and a cd anthology box (Ambience Dub 1982-1985). This is a heavy duty, wandering slice of Sherwood dub with Bim Sherman’s vocals floating above the rhythms. Echo, reverb, hisses, wobbles, sounds dropping in and out. FRiday has come and it’s not a second too soon.

Dub Archive

After all that New Order (and I could go on I’m sure) it’s time for a change of pace and style. Andrew Weatherall has uploaded another edition of his R.G.C. Archive Hour and it’s another dub special. Opening with Sly and Robbie with Bunny Lee and running through to The Disciples via Mad Professor, Joe Gibbs and the wonderfully named song Drugs Is A Ting by Bush Chemist.

A Dub Tribulation – Sly & Robbie Vs. Bunny Lee
African Child (Dubz) – Sly & Robbie Vs. Bunny Lee
C.T.U.F.B – Sound Iration
Drugs Is A Ting – Bush Chemist
Rockfort Rock (Version) – Teamworks
Willow Tree (Dub) – Linval Thompson and the Revolutionaries
Whenever You Need Me (Dub) – Cornell Campbell
Dub Service – Mad Professor
Kunte Kinte The African Warrior – Mad Professor
Ghetto Pace – Mad Professor
Walls Of Jericho – Joe Gibbs & The Professionals
Revenge – Joe Gibbs & The Professionals
World Of Dub – The Revolutionaries
Natural Dub – Lidj Incorporated
The Message – The Disciples

Steppas Delight

Let’s start the week- I was going to say working week but it’s not a working week for me, I’ve finished for the summer- with an hour’s worth of Mr Weatherall playing dub , all salvaged from the Rotters Golf Club. This is volume 7 in the R.G.C. Archive Hour and is wall to wall Jamaican goodness.

The picture is a page from ID magazine, a dj five way split with Paul Oakenfold, Sasha, Darren Emerson, Fabi Paras and Andrew Weatherall. Weatherall (bottom right, face obscured by a 7″ single) describes his occupation as ‘trainspotter’ and claims to be working on ‘a pop long player’.

Steppas Delight
Open Troppen – Mad Professor
No Love (Version) – Team Works
River Jordan – Dub Dynasty
Macky Lane Rock – Mr Dynamic All Stars
No Idiot Dub – King Tubby
Chalice Man Dub – Sly & Robbie And The Revolutionaries
Grounation Rock – Adashanti I
Mystic Electro Harakiri – Pecker
The Grunwick Affair – Dennis Bovell
Cool Stepping – The Simeons
Mack At Control – The Simeons
Dub Signs – Alpha & Omega
Dubbing In Angola – Pablo Moses
International Treaty – Joe Gibbs & The Professionals
Majestic Dub – Joe Gibbs & The Professionals
African Boat Man – Mix Man