Mountain

One of my brethren is of the opinion that most of what I post here is good but my main open goal, shot-in-the-foot, self inflicted wound and weakness is Dreadzone. Which mystifies me a bit. They have form (a string of albums packed with good tunes covering reggae, dub, roots, techno and dance). They have background and authenticity (Big Audio Dynamite’s rhythm section became Dreadzone). Their live shows are the stuff of legend. So enough Sep, and to paraphrase many an early 90s indie group, ‘I just post what I like here and if anyone else likes it, it’s a bonus’. On with the Dreadzone.

The latest Dreadzone album, Dread Times, is out now and was preceded by this single, a bass heavy, British roots reggae bouncer, recorded at Mick Jones’ studio. The title of the album and its lyrical concerns are very 2017 and with its variety of guest vocalists- Don Letts, ragga duo Louchie Lou and Michie One, and Lena Cullen- this is very much modern West London reggae, best played loud with a full bottom end. At the end of album opener Rootsman a voice intones ‘roots music can never die’- something they seem to prove with every release.

That’s The Sound Of The Man Working On The Chain Gang

I don’t know where this photo of Mick Jones comes from (or where I got it for that matter)- long hair, floral shirt, red trousers all makes it post Clash I think. This curio came my way via email recently too from old friend/reader Dub Robots. 7 Years was a Big Audio Dynamite demo from 1988 just Mick, drum machine and spare guitar. Someone called IndieGround and Heston have re-imagined it adding samples, instruments and more voices and turned it into a nicely B.A.D. piece of work, totally unofficial but rather good. There’s a link on the Youtube page if you want a download version.

There are multiple B.A.D. bootlegs available out in the internet, The B.A.D. Files, running up from Volume 1 through to 9, containing all kinds of odds and ends. This, if you’re interested, is Mick’s original demo of 7 Years.

7 Years (Original Demo)

Into Forever

Eat Lights Become Lights have a new one out soon. Back in 2014 they released Into Forever which included this beautiful, stargazing ten minute album closer. A lot of their output is krautrock inspired, busy mechanical rhythms and psychey drones. This one is celestial and introspective and could be double the length and not get boring

Into Forever

I Can’t Die, Lie Or End Time

I found this the other day on Twitter. Admittedly the photo drew me in first but the music is well worth your attention if you’re after something new. JGrrey is from South London and has a six track ep out now, a blend of hazy soul and something modern. I’m particularly enjoying the voice and echo trumpet versus beats on Your GF Can’t Kick It and the r ‘n’b-isms of L.O.V.E. This all sounds really now.

God’s Waiting Room

Not content with giving us an Andrew Weatherall radio show every month NTS Radio have now given David Holmes a two hour window to broadcast in. If you got Holmes’ Late Night Tales album last year you’ll have an idea of ¬†where he’s at at the moment. God’s Waiting Room takes in soundtracks, library recordings, psych, rock ‘n’ roll and other recordings from the further extremities of a man’s record collection. No tracklist though so your guess in many cases is as good as mine. In fact your guess may be better than mine.

Ghost Piano

If you’re after something new and a tad unsettling then you could do worse than have a look at this. Harvey Sharman Dunn had an old upright piano, much loved but knackered. It had to go but before it did he recorded the sound of all the keys (some in tune, some less so). He’s now used those samples, decorated and distorted them, to create an album called Tales From The Ghost Piano which is pretty in places, spooky in others and downright freaked out elsewhere.

It is free/pay what you want from Bandcamp. Get it here.

Harvey has also included a cover of Sparklehorse’s It’s A Wonderful Life, one of the bleakest songs I’ve ever enjoyed.

It’s A Gas

I was watching a programme about India recently and this song, Ananda Shankar’s sitar version of Jumpin’ Jack Flash was playing in the background. My first reaction was ‘all those thousands of songs played by Indian musicians and they have to choose a Stones cover, bah humbug, grumble grumble etc’. But then I checked myself and thought ‘well, Ananda Shankar was a Bengali musician so there is that’ and ‘the song is a magnificent blast so stop being stupid’. I think I first became aware of it thanks to David Holmes’ Essential Selection where it fitted in perfectly with that mid 90s pick ‘n’ mix aesthetic, rock and roll and funk and soul and everything else too.

Jumpin’ Jack Flash