National Pastime

Drew wrote a post a while ago saying that blogging often seems to be about exposing the obscure, bringing to light long forgotten songs and the ones that got missed. In the spirit of that here is an absolute lost gem, a Factory Records B-side by Stockholm Monsters, straight outta Burnage. This song was the flipside to All At Once, released in June 1984.

Opening with clattering drums and a low slung bass, then get a beautifully naive topline and a wonderful non-singer’s vocal. Produced by Peter Hook and lost by a record company who wouldn’t pay for pluggers and promotion because they believed the music would sell itself. If this was the only song they’d released, they’d still more than deserve a place in a version of mid-80s indie scene. A little slice of perfection.

National Pastime

Advertisements

Fairy Tales

More Factory for Friday. Stockholm Monsters were mates from Burnage, on Factory between 1981 and ’87, who made some cracking guitar singles housed in some beautiful sleeves but, it almost goes without saying, hardly sold any records. Tony Wilson loved them. Fairy Tales was their debut release from January 1982, produced by Martin Hannett, sparse and spindly with piano and flute and some typically Hannett touches making this anything but ordinary early 80s indie. There are loads more gems in their small back catalogue, including their only album which was produced by Peter Hook.

Fairy Tales

>Burnage’s Number One Band

>

Stockholm Monsters came from Burnage, South Manchester and spent much of the 80s trying to make a success of being on Factory Records. They had all the benefits- Peter Hook as producer and cheer leader, Anthony H Wilson’s patronage, gigs with the other bands, some press coverage, beautiful sleeves. However as most Factory bands before ’87 found out, if you weren’t New Order you didn’t sell records, not outside the Greater Manchester postcode areas anyway. They started out fairly sparse sounding and post-punkish, trumpet and keyboards as well as guitars and driving drums, and eventually prefigured some of the Madchester sound with electronics and grooves, and a Perry Boy (Mancunian scallies essentially) image. They split in 1987 having been overtaken at Palatine Road and in the press by Happy Mondays. This song came out at the end, Partyline, and it’s flawed but worth your while. Produced by Hook, Partylive Mix from the 12″, Fac 146 in case you were wondering.

Partyline (Partylive Mix).mp3#1#1