Come Back

Pete Wylie has a version of The Mighty Wah! back out on the road with a handful of gigs this month and bunch more in November. It is a blogging requirement by constitution and tradition that The Story Of The Blues is posted by music blogs at least once annually. I’ve posted it before and a very smart re-edit version which some of you enjoyed a lot. In a break with expectation instead I’m posting another 12″ Wylie epic from 1984.

Come Back (The Story Of The Reds) and the Devil In Miss Jones (Combined and Extended)

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No! Say It Loud, No!

Today, Pete Wylie. Yesterday The Vinyl Villain published a post on the third member of The Crucial Three- Pete Wylie and his Mighty Wah! a blogpost so comprehensive and with comments so good I rewrote my planned post for today. So instead of what I had partly written I’m revisiting a version of a Mighty Wah! song I have posted before, a brilliantly executed re-edit of The Mighty Wah’s The Story Of The Blues (Part 2) from the Edit Service people. A long electronic drum intro, the female backing vox and then Pete Wylie’s spoken part, including that quote from Jack Kerouac- ‘I remember something Sal Paradise said ‘the city intellectuals of the world were divorced from the folkbody of the land and were just rootless fools” and Wylie’s message, ‘you’ve got to hope for the best and that’s the best you can hope for’ and ultimately say ‘No!’. If you love the original, you’ll love this too. Promise.

That’s My Story And I’m Sticking To It

I just found this and thought some of you might like it- a re-edit of The Mighty Wah’s mighty The Story Of The Blues single, lovingly unwrapped over eight and half minutes, for a true Balearic end of night escapade where you want just one last song to send you on your way before you spill out into the streets to see the dawn. May or may not be the work of Ivan Smagghe.  At Soundcloud here and available for download.

You’re my best mate you are.

>Wah Wah

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This is one of those records that often seems to populate the 7″ box in charity shops, all dog eared sleeves and scratched disc. I’ve written before of my buying multiple copies of records in Oxfam and suchlike over the years, just because I can’t leave them in the shop, decaying and unloved, surely eventually ending up as landfill. However I could not house the numbers of copies of this single I’ve seen. Why is it so often abandoned?

Our local Oxfam occasionally turns up trumps- one time it was full of the entire Siouxsie And The Banshees back catalogue and most of Wah!s output. I was trying to work out what sort of person would have such musical taste, to collect the full works of both the ice queen of goth and Liverpool’s ‘part time rock star, full time legend’. But then again maybe it was two different people, coincidentally getting rid of vinyl at the same time. Or even better, maybe it was a couple, each one dumping it’s youthful record collection to make space in a new place they’ve just got together, one a Banshees fan, the other a Wylie lover – that’s an idea I like. But I’m sure I would’ve spotted a Siouxsie lookalike and a Wylie wannabee wandering around Sale by now.

Enough blathering. From 1984, The Mighty Wah!’s mighty Come Back. It’s not as good maybe as The Story Of The Blues or Sinful, but it’s still worth a few minutes of your time.

Come Back.mp3

The Mighty Wah! ‘Talkin’ Blues’ (The Story Of The Blues Pt. 2)

I was never into The Mighty Wah!, Wah!, Wah! Heat, or any of the other names for Pete Wylie’s ego during the 1980s and into the 90s, but shifted recently. I played records at a wedding (friends of friends, not doing that again, stress and hassle), and the groom insisted I played The Story Of The Blues. Once it was on I realised it was better than I thought. A few weeks back I found a stash of Wah! 7″ singles in Oxfam in Altrincham and enjoyed most of them.

This is off the album A Word To The Wiseguy, much of which is Pete Wylie’s heart-felt response to the effects of Thatcherism on Liverpool. It’s a sprawling album, with some dated production, but some of it stands up today. This version of The Story Of The Blues comes up near the end, the horns from the single version looped while Wylie does some talking over the top, including quoting Sal Paradise from Kerouac’s On The Road, and maybe it shouldn’t work, but Wylie gets away with it.

4shared.com – online file sharing and storage – download The Mighty Wah!_15_Talkin’ Blues (The Story Of The Blues Pt. 2).mp3