This Is How It Feels

You may have heard the sad news that Inspiral Carpets drummer Craig Gill died last week aged just 44. Friends and fans have launched a campaign to get their 1994 single Saturn 5 to the number one slot for Christmas as a tribute, so you know what to do. Back in 1990 this was the song that broke them through from a local concern to a national following.

Back before Manchester City got a load of cash United fans used to be able to sing along to this with different words- ‘this is how it feels to be City, this is how it feels to be small, this is how it feels when your team wins nothing at all’. Alas, we can sing it no more.

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The Chart Show

The Chart Show was more or less the only place to watch videos in the late 80s and early 90s, MTV being the preserve of the well off. Every week it had a specialist chart, indie, dance or metal and was required viewing, often with a hangover and a day with no responsibilities in front of you. So, make yourself a cup of tea, sit back and slip back in time…

…to October 1989’s dance chart with Electribe 101 and De La Soul…

… and to the indie chart in April 1991, with New Fast Automatic Daffodils and The Shamen, showing dance’s influence on indie…

…and from a few years later, February 1994, this top ten run down has the mighty Inspiral Carpets and Mark E Smith collaboration and Suede…

No metal charts here I’m afraid but there’s plenty more where these clips came from if you look at the Youtube sidebar.

Cool As Carpet

Continuing my new, semi-regular feature of bands and songs names related to , um, flooring and it’s Oldham’s Inspiral Carpets. I used to like them and for a while shared a house with a bloke who was obsessed with them. They had a long, slow decline but some decent pop hits in 89 and 90, despite Shaun Ryder’s comment that they were ‘clueless knobheads’. Bit rude really. There’s the MES collaboration which is good. This Is How It Feels. Commercial Rain. Directing Traffic. But they never really sounded better than on this tinny, organ and guitar garage romp, a tribute to Joe, a tramp who lived on Sackville Street in town. Although I don’t think this is the earlier version off the legendary Dung 4 cassette (which I flogged on ebay recently for a fiver).

Joe