I Like To Sit In Back, Watch Out For The Cops

We’ve not had any action from The Cramps here for a while so let’s delve into Lux and Ivy’s world today. Stay Sick in 1990 is some kind of high watermark in Crampdom. After that there are fewer great Cramp moments. Look Mom No Head! from 1991 had this song on it, which never fails to raise the spirits.

Bend Over, I’ll Drive

The Volume Curve

The weekend and the presentation went very well. We caught up with lots of families we’ve met before and got introduced to new ones, dealing with diagnoses and disabled children and life limiting illness. It’s good but I’m feeling knackered and drained already and that’s not a good way to start the week.

Chris Rotter, round here recently as a member of The Patti Yang Group and Two Lone Swordsmen’s guitar wrangler,tipped me off to this song he’s involved with by Le Volume Courbe. Led by French-born, London-based singer Charlotte Marionneau, Le Volume Courbe play sweet psychedelic pop and have previously recorded with Kevin Shields, Hope Sandoval and members of Primal Scream. This song, The House, is a beauty, all sun dappled and full of gorgeous melodies.

Sent To Coventry

We are in Coventry this weekend, at a Conference/family weekend held by the charity that works to help families affected by the set of genetic diseases that our eldest I.T. is affected by. I am doing a short presentation in today’s meeting about I.T.’s transition from children’s services to adult services. Speaking to several hundred people. Gulp. If I still smoked, I’d be smoking right before that.

Coventry brings four things to mind for me, not necessarily in this order- a) the modernist concrete Cathedral and city centre due to bombing raids during World War Two b) Coventry City’s chocolate brown away kit from the late 1970s c) Lady Godiva’s naked protest and d) The Specials and The Special AKA. Jerry Dammers soldiered on after the departure of the Fun Boy Three to make the In The Studio album. Popular wisdom usually holds that the first two Specials albums, with Terry, Lynval and Neville, are the cream of the crop. But What I Like Most About You Is Your Girlfriend is absolutely as good as anything the first line up produced and the video is a blast too. I have posted this before but it’s good enough to do twice.

Destroy Us

Life has been somewhat busy recently, the last few days especially. This post is a bit lazy. But better to post lazily than not at all. This is Timothy J. Fairplay’s remix of Le Carousel’s Destroy Us from earlier this year.

Destroy Us (Timothy J Fairplay Remix)

Just A Trick Of The Light

Orange Juice have such an embarrassment of riches in their back catalogue, all skewiff and untutored and out of kilter. It’s their rough edges that make them so loveable I think. From their early days, this is the magnificent, frenetic Felicity (written by Malcolm Ross). This version was from a flexi disc given away free with the first 1000 copies of Falling And Laughing, recorded live in Edinburgh in 1979.

Felicity (Flexi Version)

From the later days, the brilliant What Presence?!, shown here live on the Whistle Test in ’84 with a squealing guitar solo (along with Out For The Count).

Ready For Dub

Last week I posted The Patti Yang Group’s I’m Ready, a smashing slice of summery house from Chris Mackin, Matty Skylab and Jagz Kooner. Quite a few of you seemed to approve. Chris has since provided this dub version, the romantically titled I’m Ready For Love Bog Dub.

 

I Love You All

On Saturday night I watched Frank, the fictionalised and dramatised version of the life of Frank Sidebottom, starring Maggie Gyllenhall and Michael Fassbender. In the film, based on Jon Ronson’s account of playing keys for Frank Sidebottom, Frank takes his band to a shack in Ireland and to their outer limits recording an album. The whole band later on collapses in Austin, Texas before playing at SXSW. Frank vanishes, turning up at a music hall where the remainder of the group are playing alt-country. Michael Fassbender, now giant headless (as Frank) is given a microphone and joins in singing this beautiful song, right at the film’s climax. The song is played by the actors and sung by Fassbender. Based partly also on the lives of Daniel Johnston and Captain Beefheart, Frank is American throughout, rather than from Timperley, and has a rich baritone rather than Chris Sievey’s squeeky voice. It doesn’t really matter, artistic license and all that. It’s a really good film and a totally affecting moment and song. This is not a novelty. You’ll love it. Promise.

I Love You All

When Chris Sievey (the real Frank Sidebottom) died he was penniless. A crowdfunded account opened to pay for his funeral and then a couple of years ago a statue was erected in Timperley village, outside what is now a Costa coffee shop. If you’re ever in the area you should pay it a visit. In the photo above Frank’s statue (right) is pictured with your Bagging Area blogger (left, obvs). Annoyingly, Frank has better hair and fewer bags under his eyes.

Moonbuilding

Moonbuilding 2703 AD, the new album by The Orb, comes out today. It’s a bit of a return to the form and sound of ‘classic’ Orb, all bubbling synths, melodies, acres of texture, ambient house and dubby basslines. Nothing happens very quickly and once things do get going, they go on for some time. This is absolutely not a criticism- the songs stretch out and wait very nicely indeed without ever getting dull, the humour and inventiveness of old keeping things rolling along. The standard version has four songs, all available to stream on the player below. The extra disc vinyl edition has three more songs which seem to take it all further. Decisions, decisions…

Echo And Delay

A short film for Father’s Day with our patron Andrew Weatherall talking about record collecting, rockabilly and dub, echo, delay, space and transcendence.

And here’s a Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry production from the heart of the 1970s, The Black Notes.

African Style

Genius

Genius might be overplaying it but it isn’t too far off. Before M-People, before T Coy, Mike Pickering formed Quando Quango with Gonnie Rietveld and her drumming brother Reinier Rietveld. ACR’s drummer Donald Johnson helped out too. They made dance music before such a thing really existed, combining the energy of New York’s early 80s music scene with northern European tastes. Gonnie described it as ‘Fela Kuti meets Kraftwerk somewhere between Manchester and Rotterdam’ This song has manipulated voices, slow and fast, intoning the groups’s name, spiraling piano parts, a Latin vibe and synths. It should have had them bouncing all over the Hacienda’s dancefloor, except this was 1985- The Smiths held sway. And although this song is now thirty years old it still sounds really fresh. I like it so much I think we’ll have two period piece pictures to go with it.

Genius