The Return Of Friday Night Is Rockabilly Night 22


Zut alors et sacre bleu, c’est rockabilly. From 1957 it’s Jimmy Lloyd. He’s got a rocket in his pocket and ‘the fuse is lit’.

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En Vacances


By the time you read this we should be on the road, off on our summer holiday. Having read Drew’s description of his French debacle last summer we thought long and hard and decided… to drive to France. We’re staying in a small house in the village of Chateauponsac, north of Limoges. It’s about three quarters of the way down France, in the middle. You can’t miss it. So, off we go, Dover today, ferry tomorrow morning, various letters in two languages to explain the large quantity of medicines we’re carrying from one country to another (for our eldest I.T., who has a variety of medical issues), a shops worth of car sweets (which will probably be gone by Knutsford), hundreds of Earl Grey tea bags (Mrs Swiss likes a cup of tea), many multi-bags of prawn cocktail crisps (I.T. again, limited diet, God knows what he’ll eat in France once the Walkers run out), several cds I’ve made for the long road trip which will contain next to nothing young E.T. will like, and as many clothes as we can fit in what’s left of the boot space. We’re not ones to pack lightly, but will most likely bring back half of it unworn. I’m really looking forward to it- the last few weeks have been a bit heavy for one reason or another and getting away to a small French village with plenty of sunshine should be great. I mean, what could possibly go wrong?

After tomorrow night’s rockabilly post there won’t be any action here at Bagging Area until the middle of August. Here’s a song to send us on our way- in 2007 Paul Weller and ex-Blur guitarist Graham Coxon released a one-off, limited 7″ three track single. The A-side was this song, a rollicking guitar tune with Coxon on vox and making the best of both men’s talents.

And I Think To Myself…



A post to tie together a couple of recent posts featuring The Ramones and Louis Armstrong, making it look dangerously like I plan what goes on here rather than just lurch from one song to another. In 2002 Joey Ramone’s only solo album came out. Released posthumously it was titled Don’t Worry About Me and opened up with a cover version of Louis Armstrong’s What A Wonderful World. It sounds just like you think it should, but is none the worse for it.

Edit- post and track removed by Blogger/DMCA. Post restored without mp3 file.

Sitar, Dub And Bass


As a follow on from Paul Weller’s Indian Vibes excursion that I posted the other day, I went back and listened to the whole e.p. Death In Vegas mainman Richard Fearless’ remix of Mathar is the stand out of the versions- some very cool electronic dub to wash over you.

We Need Nothing More


As far as I’m aware, since they delivered Loveless in 1991, My Bloody Valentine have recorded only two songs- one was a cover of a Wire song Map Ref 41n 93w (posted here some time ago) and the other was this cover version of Louis Armstrong’s Bond theme We Have All The Time In The World. This is very swirly and dreamy and has Bilinda Butcher’s vocals to the fore (by MBV’s standards) but it’s also a pretty straight cover with Kevin Shields keeping the melody and strings intact. It hasn’t got that totally disorientating, weightless, headswimming effect that Loveless or Isn’t Anything had. Well worth a listen as a starter, especially if you stick Soon on afterwards for the main course.

Twenty Seven Forever


I posted this A Certain Ratio song last October. It feels fitting somehow this weekend. Poor old Amy.

Sitar, Drums And Bass


A track from 1998 which sounds surprisingly good today- Mathar by Indian Vibes, with some very catchy sitar playing, and general 90s clubbiness (y’know, Sunday Social, Chemical Brothers, that kind of thing). Indian Vibes was Paul Weller and chums with producer Brendan Lynch. The 12″ came with two remixes, one by Death In Vegas’ Richard Fearless who took it dubwards and another by Primal Scream who turned in something very noisy indeed. There’s much to enjoy in this extended version.