Sometimes These Words Just Don’t Have To Be Said

I read, skimmed more likely, an article recently about albums that are 30 years old this year- REM’s Document, The Smiths’ Strangeways, Here We Come and The Jesus And Mary Chain’s Darklands were the three guitar led biggies. It also included George Best by The Wedding Present, a record Dave Gedge and his band have been touring all year.

George Best is a superb album. Released in October 1987 George Best is the sound of four men plugging in and playing. There is no sense of production to speak of, no studio presence or tricks, just two guitars, bass and drums, recorded as they sounded live. Low budget, no frills. The cover shot picture of George Best and the green frame look like they could have been knocked up in minutes (and what a great shot of George it is). From the moment the needle hits the vinyl (or the cassette tape starts to spool) the 1987 indie kid then got twelve snapshots of Dave Gedge’s gruff northern voice over indie guitar rock. Gedge’s conversational lyrics and delivery were easy to identify with, a kind of northern (universal) poetry.

The album included a new version of the single that preceded it, My Favourite Dress. It opens with crunchy guitars, a two chord riff, and then the band come in. Gedge’s first verse deals with jealousy (‘am essential part of love’) and then comes the resigned ‘there’s always something left behind- nevermind’. In verse two a drunken Gedge describes the ‘scent of someone else in the blanket where we lay’. And then we get the best bit, the change, and a list of painful reminders of her- uneaten meals, a welcome ride in a neighbour’s car, getting soaked walking home, falling asleep waiting up for her to come home- building up to him seeing her kissing someone else and his hand on the dress. A growl as he delivers the final line ‘that was my favourite dress you know’. Love and loss in your late teens/early twenties skewered.

My Favourite Dress

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